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What we Grow...

We grow several hardwood species on our plantations and continually conduct in-depth research into various timber and other commodity based assets that we feel offer long term market appeal coupled with attractive financial attributes and low to moderate risk exposure.

The fast growing Paulownia tree, when grown under managed plantation conditions thrive and produce a high quality, structurally strong lumber source. The wood is fabricated into thousands of different products that include fine furniture, doors, surf boards, inner shells for burial caskets, specialty wine boxes, decorative moldings, cutting boards, window blinds and shutters, and more.

Local species trees such as Coaba, Cedro Real, and Pochote are grown as they each have unique marketability attributes. The Cedro Real Tree (Spanish Cedar) is in the same family as Mahogany and is a much sought after tropical timber species which once predominated the forests from Mexico to Brazil. Traditional logging in the 1800′s and 1900′s would primarily target two species; Spanish Cedar and Mahogany. Both species easily float and this made them the easy target to be extracted through the network of rivers which existed in the virgin rainforest. Spanish Cedar is also on the CITES endangered species list due to its high demand internationally which has led to its depletion, making this tree the ideal choice for sustained profit potential. Spanish Cedar is a sought after hardwood that grows well in wet tropical, and dry sub-tropical climates. It has a semi shiny appearance, a medium texture, and pronounced veins. It is easy to saw and a favorite of craftsmen working with hand tools. The wood has many uses including; fine furniture and cabinetry, bedroom furniture, doors, windows, decorative veneers, and cigar boxes.

Cedro Real (Spanish Cedar) is in the same family as Mahogany and is a much sought after tropical timber species which once predominated the forests from Mexico to Brazil. Traditional logging in the 1800′s and 1900′s would primarily target just two species; Spanish Cedar and Mahogany as both float and can be extracted through the network of rivers which existed in the virgin rainforest. Spanish Cedar is also on the CITES endangered species list due to its high demand internationally which has led to its depletion making this tree the ideal choice for sustained profit potential. Spanish Cedar is a sought after hardwood that grows well in wet tropical, and dry sub-tropical climates. It has a semi shiny appearance, a medium texture, and pronounced veins. It is a wood moderately resistant to decay and fungus attack, and very resistant to underground and dry wood termites. It is easy to saw and a favorite of craftsmen working with hand tools. The wood has many uses including; fine furniture and cabinetry, bedroom furniture, doors, windows, decorative veneers, and cigar boxes. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

Pochote (Red Ceiba) is the name of a very special local tree. Most people in Nicaragua know the tree for its precious wood. Throughout the region its wood is as valuable as mahogany; consequently most of the larger trees were exploited decades ago. However, we are fortunate to have several old species on our property that survived, and we are now planting the species again. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

Caoba (Pacific Mahogany) is a small to medium-sized deciduous tree with a dark-grey or brownish-black, longitudinally fissured bark and in older specimens rough and flaking. The heavy timber is used in local carpentry. The seeds of the Coaba are used in traditional medicine to treat chest pains, coughs, cancer and amoebiasis, and for their anthelmintic properties. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

Cocobolo (Daibergia Refusa) is a plant species in the genus Dalbergia. It is known to produce the wood called cocobolo. It is a fair-sized tree, reported to reach 20–25 m in height. This is probably the species contributing most of the wood in the trade. Because of the wood's great beauty and high value, the trees yielding this wood have been heavily exploited and are now rare outside national parks, reserves, and plantations. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

Teak (Tectona Grandis) is a tropical hardwood species placed in the family Lamiaceae. Tectona grandis is a large, deciduous tree that occurs in mixed hardwood forests. It has small, fragrant white flowers and papery leaves that are often hairy on the lower surface. It is sometimes known as the ‘Burmese Teak’. Teak wood has a leather-like smell when it is freshly milled. It is particularly valued for its durability and water resistance, and is used for boat building, exterior construction, veneer, furniture, carving, turnings, and other small wood projects. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

Khaya Nyasica (African Mahogany) is a genus of seven speciesof trees in the mahogany family Meliaceae, native to tropical Africa and Madagascar. All species become big trees 30–35 m tall, rarely 45 m, with a trunk over 1 m trunk diameter, often buttressed at the base. The leaves are pinnate, with 4-6 pairs of leaflets, the terminal leaflet absent; each leaflet is 10–15 cm long abruptly rounded toward the apex but often with an acuminate tip. The leaves can be either deciduous or evergreen depending on the species. The flowers are produced in loose inflorescences, each flower small, with four or five yellowish petals and ten stamens. The fruit is a globose four or five-valved capsule 5–8 cm diameter, containing numerous winged seeds. Click Here - Download our PDF for more information.

 

Imported Species

Paulownia is the world’s best ultra growth rate regenerating hardwood tree. It produces large amounts of valuable timber in frequent cycles. When grown under the correct conditions it can reach as high as 4 meters (12 ft) in approximately six months, and by the age of five the tree can be harvested for the production of sawn lumber. Even though Paulownia has been one of the most versatile timbers in existence, western popularity has only recently begun to grow; especially in the manufacturing of plantation shutters, decorative molding, and high quality veneers.

Timber Properties
Paulownia is a deciduous hardwood that produces a light golden – pale blonde colored wood. The lumber is 30% lighter than comparable hardwoods and satisfies the market need for both near and far term replacement of diminishing old growth timber supplies. The timber can air dry in 30 to 60 days and has a long straight grain, a silky feel, is relatively odorless, and mostly free from knots. It doesn’t warp or shrink and is virtually rot free. Japanese craftsmen have utilized this revered wood for decades in ceremonial furniture, decorative moldings, musical instruments, laminated structural beams, footwear (clogs), and shipping containers. In the West, craftsmen fabricate boats, surfboards, household furniture, moldings and internal construction panels, as well as plywood. Several institutions are also conducting research to develop fast growing Paulownia as a sustainable source of bio-fuel, a crucial step towards solving the global energy crisis.

Environmental Properties
The Paulownia Tree naturally regenerates from its existing root. This characteristic gives investors multiple rotations of timber growth and multiple harvests without the need for major soil preparation or replanting. Paulownia is virtually fire resistant with an ignition temp of 420 – 430 degrees Celsius compared to average hardwoods at 220 – 225 degrees Celsius. The fast growth and enormous leaves of the Paulownia tree facilitate an immense capacity for Carbon absorption, and its deep running root system gives it.

 

 



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